Category: electric

Ohm’s law formula

Go to Ohm’s law calculator. Ohm’s law define current magnitude of the current that flows through out resistor like one given in figure bellow (Ohm’s law circuit). So current through resistor R, according to Ohm’s law formula is This form

Posted in electric Tagged with: , , , ,

Current Divider Formula

Go to current divider calculator. Current divider is actually two resistors connected in parallel. Now, if we know input current and R1 and R2 resistor value, we can calculate how input current will split up, i.e. how much are I1

Posted in electric Tagged with: ,

Voltage Divider Formula

Go to voltage divider online calculator. Voltage divider is actually two resistors connected in series. Now, if we know VCC and R1 and R2 resistor value, there is a question, how much is VOUT? By intuition, if R1=R2 then VOUT

Posted in electric Tagged with: ,

Serial R-C circuit impedance

Go to Serial R-C circuit impedance calculator Serial R-C circuit is given in figure bellow In the stationary regime, we can use complex impedance for capacitor and R for resistor. So final expression for serial R-C circuit impedance It is

Posted in electric

Parallel R-C circuit impedance

Go to Parallel R-C circuit impedance calculator Parallel R-C circuit is given in figure bellow In the stationary regime, we can use complex impedance for capacitor and R for resistor. Parallel R-C impedance is So final expression for parallel R-C

Posted in electric

102-wheatstone-measurement-bridge-simulation

Go to Wheatstone measurement bridge simulation Wheatstone bridge or Wheatstone measurement bridge is electric circuit for very precise resistance or impedance measurement. It has simple construction and generally looks like it is shown in picture bellow. It can operate in

Posted in electric

60-thevenen-theorem

Thevenen’s theorem states that any collection of voltage sources, current sources, and resistors is electrically equivalent to an ideal voltage source with a single equivalent resistor. Steps of the analysis: Find equivalent resistor of the circuit by replacing load resistor

Posted in electric

125-star-delta-or-y-delta-transformation-simulation

Go to star-delta (y-delta) transformation calculator Standard 3 phase circuit can have different topologies, but most common are star (sometimes also called Y, T or wye) and delta topology (sometimes also called triangle or pi), both given in figure bellow.

Posted in electric

104-r-c-circuit-integrator

Go to R-C circuit integrator simulation R-C or RC circuit integrator is kind of first order circuits. First order circuit means that it’s behavior is described with differential equation of first order. R-C circuit integrator is actually just series R-C

Posted in electric

103-r-c-circuit-differentiator

Go to R-C circuit differentiator R-C or RC circuit differentiator is kind of first order circuits. First order circuit means that it’s behavior is described with differential equation of the first order. R-C circuit looks like it is shown in

Posted in electric

99-phasor-ac-signal-multiplication-and-division

When complex number represent stationary AC signal, it is called phasor. Complex number and so phasor can be presented with two equivalent notifications: Cartesian coordinates Polar coordinates Knowing exponential representative of complex number, we have relation between complex number and

Posted in electric

98-phasor-ac-signal-addition-and-subtraction

When complex number represent stationary AC signal, it is called phasor. Complex number and so phasor can be presented with two equivalent notifications: Cartesian coordinates Polar coordinates Knowing exponential representative of complex number, we have relation between complex number and

Posted in electric

58-northons-theorem

Norton’s theorem states that any collection of voltage sources, current sources, and resistors is electrically equivalent to an ideal current source with a single equivalent resistor. Steps of the analysis: Find equivalent resistor of the circuit by replacing load resistor

Posted in electric

48-nodal-analysis

Nodal analysis (also called node voltage analysis or branch current method) is practical method for electric circuit analysis with small number of nodes and possibly large number of mesh. All equations are written according KCL, so it is important to

Posted in electric

56-mesh-analysis

Mesh analysis (or the mesh current method) is a method that is used to solve planar circuits for the currents (and indirectly the voltages). Planar circuits are circuits that can be drawn on a plane surface with no wires crossing

Posted in electric

49-kirchhoff-circuit-laws

Both Kirchhoff’s current law and Kirchhoff’s voltage law can be directly derived from Maxwell’s equations. However, Kirchhoff’s circuit laws are simplified form of Maxwell’s equations designated for electric circuit analysis. Kirchhoff’s current law known also as KCL, Kirchhoff’s first law

Posted in electric

Inverse Fourier transform and Inverse DFT

IDFT – Inverse Discrete Fourier Transform calculator Purpose of inverse Fourier transform as well as IDFT – inverse DFT is to recover original signal from it’s sine and cosine Fourier coefficients. Schematically it is presented in figure bellow. Fourier Transform

Posted in electric

Fourier transform and DFT discrete Fourier transform

DFT – Discrete Fourier Transform calculator Purpose of Fourier Transform as well as DFT – Discrete Fourier Transform is to transform input signal (analog or digital) to sum of sine and cosine coefficients. Schematically it is presented in figure bellow.

Posted in electric

108-delta-star-or-delta-y-transformation-simulation

Delta-Star or Delta-Y Transformation Calculator Standard 3 phase circuit can have different topologies, but most common are delta Δ (sometimes also called triangle or pi) and star (sometimes also called Y, T or wye) topology, both given in figure bellow.

Posted in electric

100-active-power-reactive-power-and-apparent-power

Simulate active, reactive and instant power. In order to understand active power, reactive power and apparent power concept easiest way is to start from stationary AC signals. In every time instant product of voltage and current gives instant power P(t)=U(t)·I(t).

Posted in electric